Announcing the Science Party Candidates for the 2016 election

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The Science Party has announced a smorgasbord of technologically and scientifically driven candidates for the 2016 election who threaten the Liberal Party’s plan to frame themselves as the innovation party. The team announced include scientists, technologists, startup founders, educators, businesspeople and consultants to the government.  

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Turnbull's rain adventure: $11m spent on pseudoscience

In 2007, Malcolm Turnbull, as Minister for the Environment and Water, decided he would try to end the drought. A noble cause, but he used $11 million of taxpayer money to trial a technology without scientific merit. What makes it even more frustrating is that trial wasn't conducted scientifically, so the experiment was a complete waste. Ian Woolf has provided us with a transcript of his show on Diffusion Science Radio.

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Science Party to invest government money in new Meme department

The Science Party has announced today the creation of a new government position Chief Memeologist and the associated department The Bureau of Memeology in it's "Dank Meme Innovation Statement".

Our proposed 13th principle.

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Sydney meeting and nominations open for the Science Party

With the election coming up soon (as early as the 2nd of July 2016), we need to settle on who will be representing the Science Party at the federal election. We will be running for both the Senate and the House of Representatives. 

The Science Party has a strong platform and we believe that we will be competitive in the upcoming federal election. Our principles are a very clear indication of what we stand for, and we will run on core ideals innovation, education and economic reform. 

Nominating

If you're interested in running as a candidate for the Science Party, please read the information below and email nominations@scienceparty.org.au by 5PM Tuesday 5th April 2016 indicating that you would like to run so that we can involve you in the selection process.

Meeting

We're also holding a meeting in Sydney and online at 6:30PM on Wednesday 6th of April 2016 to help plan for the election.  

 

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Meeting Minutes - March 2016

Minutes of the Science Party Monthly Meeting

6.30pm, 24 March 2016

225 George St, Sydney

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The Science Party First Nations Treaty Policy

The Science Party First Nations Treaty policy is to establish a treaty organisation to develop treaties for ratification by parliament and indigenous groups throughout Australia. We have made this policy because it is the right thing to do.

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The new look Science Party

The Science Party has a new name, and now it has a new look. As members of the Science Party, we are greater than the sum of our parts and we think Science and Technology are the building blocks of great policy. Our new logo reflects that.

Science Party logo

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Diagnosis: Aging. Treating age as disease to increase our healthspan

Aging and death has been an unfortunate reality for all of history. The Science Party doesn’t accept that this should be the case. That’s why we’ve added a section to our Health Policy that commits us to treating aging as a disease.

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Senate voting changes increases risk of Coalition control: Modelling

In this post, we investigate the impact of the proposed voting changes on splitting of preference flows which may lead to Coalition control of the Senate. This model was produced by James Jansson and submitted to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters on the 29th February 2016. 

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The Greens could hand the Liberals a majority in the Senate

Under a optional preferential voting system, votes will expire. In fact, many people will simply vote "1" above the line (despite it technically being an informal vote). The authors of the legislation understand the high likelihood of this happening, and have accordingly implemented a "saving mechanism" that will ensure that the vote is counted in that column  

Parties that have overlapping demographics will split the vote, and only pass on a fraction of the votes they receive due to vote exhaustion (preferences running out). This results in a reduction the total voting power of that demographic. That's bad for democracy, no matter who you support. In particular, if you are left of centre, the existence of two nominally left-leaning parties (The Greens and the Labor party) are a threat to the representation of your views. 

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