Pages tagged "upper"

  • Candidate for the Senate - NSW

    $1,232.00 raised
    Goal: $3,000.00 raised

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    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate
    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate

    Eve Slavich is a statistician at the University of New South Wales, providing consulting to academics and students across all disciplines. She has a PhD in ecological statistics. Eve was also a Senate candidate for the Science Party in 2016.

    "I'm running as a Science Party candidate for the senate because I want to fix Australia's future, and the future of my children.

    We think investment in science and technology research industries is the path to solving the complex problems Australia faces and improving our quality of life. The health enjoyed by my kids is the result of billions of hours of research and innovation, and I want Australia to have a great economy built on knowledge industries and great quality of life.

    I'm sick to the core of inaction on climate change. An emissions trading scheme and a policy is to make Australia a renewable energy exporter, transitioning to 800% renewables aims to prevent catastrophic climate change.

    Solutions require people supported by world class infrastructure and education, and we will build high speed rail from Brisbane to Melbourne, promote density and build a charter city.

    Globally, Australians are amongst the most privileged people and I strongly believe we have a moral right to offer the opportunities of our country to more people. Acknowledging concerns about environmental sustainability and population growth; we actually know that the global population is expected to peak in our children's lifetime due to the link between health, women's rights and birth rates and this is accelerated by migration. People are smart and with a government that values innovation and science, we will find solutions.

    Those of us in the Science Party are concerned about encroachments on civil liberties in this country, which is why Australia needs a bill of rights, whistle blower protection and a federal ICAC.

    Further, Science party has policies for genuine economic reform, like abolishing the capital gains tax discount, replacing stamp duty with land tax and removing superannuation tax loopholes, doing the right thing to build an egalitarian society.

    We have a great team, led by Andrea Leong, with a comprehensive and evidence-based policy platform, and we need your vote on election day. In NSW, vote #1 Science in the Senate for your future."

     

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  • Candidate for the Senate - NSW

    $2,350.00 raised
    Goal: $3,000.00 raised

    Link to facebook page Link to twitter account

    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate
    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate

    I was born in Newcastle, NSW and spent my early childhood on the southern shores of lake Macquarie; the second eldest of seven.

    I have worked in the private and public sectors, as well as being a small business owner. The greatest satisfaction in my working life was in being employed on contract for a national program involved in identifying and quantifying problems in Indigenous housing. This work took me across the Top End and into remote communities from Elcho Island to Daly River.

    Currently retired, my passions are in researching and writing about Cold War history (I am the author of "Lee Harvey Oswald's Cold War"), music and sport.

    This party knows that technology is the driver of the future. We have to ensure it is harnessed for the greater good, not the enrichment of the few.

    I also share my colleagues' interest in human rights, social justice and parliamentary reform, among other issues. I want to contribute to bringing ethics and public benefit back into a polity that has been imploding for at least a decade under the burden of self interest and lobbyists.

     

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  • Candidate for the Senate - NSW

    $36.20 raised
    Goal: $3,000.00 raised

    Link to facebook page

    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate
    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate

    Peter Furness is a former councillor and deputy mayor of South Sydney. He co-founded Australian Marriage Equality in 2004 and was its convenor from 2004 to 2011. He lives in Sydney with his husband Theo and recently took up cycling to and from work to improve his health and reduce his environmental footprint.

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  • Candidate for the Senate - NSW

    $3,060.00 raised
    Goal: $3,000.00 raised

    Link to facebook page Link to twitter account

    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate
    How to vote Science in the NSW Senate

    Andrea Leong is the Leader of the Science Party and the party's lead candidate for the Senate in NSW. She completed a PhD on antibacterial surfaces at the University of New South Wales in 2016, and then moved into microbiome research. She lives in Sydney's inner west and plays percussion with a few community bands and orchestras.

    Andrea joined the Science Party (then the Future Party) in 2014 to support the voices that are too rare in politics. Her expectations of politicians are simple: tell the truth, value people, and respect evidence when making decisions.

    Believing in the worth of people means fighting for top-notch public education and healthcare, and providing a safety net when people need it, so that everyone has a decent opportunity to make their life what they want it to be.

    Investing in discovery and infrastructure consistently pays dividends. The Science Party has a policy of doubling public research funding, which is often returned three-fold to the economy. A real National Broadband Network and High Speed Rail will link people to services, business opportunities, and each other.

    The evidence for human-induced climate change is abundant. Our government's failure to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels is pure negligence.

    The evidence for much of Australia's overbearing legislation passed in the name of national security is nonexistent. We oppose these threats to our privacy and civil liberties.

    The above must be underpinned by a commitment to good government. An honest public service has nothing to fear from an integrity commission. The Australian government must also enter into treaty negotiations as a step towards reconciliation.

     

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